Technical diagrams explain what our products do and how they work together. They can also illustrate concepts, technological approaches, or processes. They support specific documentation and have intended context, purpose, and audience.

 

ELEMENTS

The primary focus should be on the components (like hardware, users, and concepts), their proximity to each other, and their common fate. Use simple shapes and icons to represent each component so that the resulting diagrams are simple, clean, and easy to understand. Using the same elements in each diagram means they work well together as a set, no matter which product they’re for. Also, it creates consistency that helps readers understand what we mean quickly.

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A. PRIMARY SHAPE

B. GROUPINGS

C. ICONS

D. LINES AND ARROWS

E. LABELS

F. COLOR

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Primary shape
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Product shape

PRIMARY SHAPE

Always use flat rectangular shapes with no drop shadows, bevels, or gradients. The only exception is for product shapes, which use the dimensional style shown here. Use product shapes sparingly.

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Cluster grouping

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Bundle grouping

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Inset grouping

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Stacked grouping

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Product grouping

GROUPINGS

Group similar (or equal) components to simplify the diagram and make the content easier to understand. Use the grouping style that best fits your content and the concept you need to illustrate.

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ICONS

Use icons only for easily recognized concepts, like people, servers, or clouds. This helps the viewer focus on the main message, instead of what individual icons mean.

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LINES & ARROWS

Lines and arrows guide the viewer through the diagram. Lines show how components relate and connect to each other. They indicate action, direction, and network connections.

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LABELS

Proper labeling is crucial. Labels identify each element and connect them to the supporting documentation.

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Group 1: Storage and big data

The diagram illustrates an overview of Red Hat Gluster Storage architecture and Storage concepts — showing the product can be installed and managed on-premise, or in a public cloud, such as Google’s Cloud Platform.

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Group 2: IT infrastructure (2A and 2B)

This diagram provides an example of the Red Hat Enterprise Virtualization environment workflow for backing up a self-hosted engine using a failover host.

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Group 2: IT infrastructure (2C)

This diagram depicts the Red Hat Satellite subscription process of registering a virtual machine.

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Group 3: Application development

This diagram illustrates an example of OpenShift routing — showing how data flows from the master through the plug-in and finally into an HAProxy configuration.

COLOR

Color is used to color-code products or create hierarchy. Use color sparingly to emphasize important pieces of information or visually connect concepts.  

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Don’t fill icons with color other than white. 

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Don’t use gradients, beveled edges, or drop shadows.

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Don’t use two product colors within a single diagram.

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Don’t use illustrations.